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Can You Freeze Fish Whole Without Cleaning Them

Can You Freeze Fish Whole Without Cleaning Them

Can You Freeze Fish Whole Without Cleaning Them

You can freeze fish whole without cleaning them, but it is better not to. Fish that are not cleaned before freezing can develop freezer burn and off-flavors. Additionally, the intestines of the fish can leak during freezing and thawing, contaminating the flesh. Thus it is best to clean and gut fish before freezing them.

It is possible to freeze fish intact, uncleaned, but care must be taken when freezing fish. You can freeze a fish whole if you know that you are going to be cooking it whole, or you can slice it up before freezing — a 3/4-inch steak or fillet. You can freeze fish without gutting it first, and you can store it that way in your freezer without issue for months. It is preferred to gut and freeze large fish in pieces, which you can pull out of the freezer when needed, instead of trying to use the whole thing at one time.

You do not want your fish sitting around in your refrigerator for two days or on ice only to have it frozen later. Keep your fish as cool as you can, from when it leaves the water until the moment it hits your carving board. Keeping the fish alive in the water will make sure that when it eventually gets to the processing stage, it is the freshest you can possibly have. Freezing the fish in water is a good way to preserve its freshness; however, the meat may soak up water in the process, turning it tomush.

Fish should not be allowed to swim in the melting water from ice, as the absorbed water in the meat has a detrimental effect on the flavor and texture of the fish. There should be a false bottom at the bottom of the cooler to allow melted ice water to escape from the fish.

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Find out how to freeze fish and avoid freezer burn

If cleaning is not an option, the fish should wait for the cooler, which has a lot of ice. Keep in mind, though, that freezing is not an ideal option, and cleaning fish prior to freezing is always preferred. Since ice is not always an option when fishing during warmer months, you will need to bloodworm and clean your catch immediately after it is caught. Expert anglers advise you should wash, bleed, and thoroughly clean your fish before placing them into your cooler.

Freeze fish without cleaning themClean fish before freezing
Fish that are not cleaned before freezing can develop freezer burn and off-flavorsCleaning fish must be done correctly to prevent any undesirable scales, bones, or bacteria
The intestines of the fish can leak during freezing and thawing, contaminating the flesh. Fish must be gutted, and cleaned before being put in an airtight, vacuum-sealed, or plastic ziplock bag
Can you freeze fish with or without cleaning them?

If making fillets, wash fish in cool, clean water to remove blood, bacteria, and digestive enzymes. Once your fish is at home and processed, thoroughly wash with cold water to eliminate any contaminants that may cause an off-flavor when frozen. Then just rinse the fish off and either put in a zipper-lock bag (removing all the air) or vacuum-seal, or use the method of freezing on the Ice.

That is right, you can store fish for over a year if they are properly vacuum sealed, and not lose any of that freshness. Fish should either be gutted/cleaned, cooked once you have finished for the day, or gutted or packed in their entirety, and then vacuum sealed. Fresh fish should be bloodied and gutted immediately after being caught, and then kept cold until cooked, whether on the same day or next.

If a fish has been bled correctly, it should be kept in a cooler filled with ice for at least one to two days after being removed. Generally, fish that has not been gutted will remain fresh and retain their flavor for approximately one to two days in an ice-filled cooler. The opposite is true when you refrigerate your fresh-gutted fish for 3 to 8 months, preserving its quality.

There will come a point when you have not cleaned and gutted the fish, and you are thinking about freezing the fish that has not been gutted. Before you begin freezing your ungutted fish, there are some things you can do to make sure that your fish will last as long as possible, and taste as fresh as possible while it is frozen. When you are freezing your ungutted fish, you want to make sure that your freezing is at about 0F (17oC) or lower, so that your fish is reminded of being fresh as much as possible. If you bring ungutted fish home, you might find it confusing whether or not you can freeze the entire fish and then remove the guts.

Properly defrosting and cleaning iced fish prior to cooking helps preserve fresh flavor and the appearance of your fish. The problem with cleaning is it strips away a lot of the natural oils in frozen fish, leaving it dry and flavorless.

Also, fish skin becomes brittle once frozen, requiring removal before it can thaw. The juices that come from the intestines soften the fishs skin, and this may affect its appearance. The gills and fins are highly sensitive to cold temperatures, and can become damaged when frozen along with the rest of the fish.

Keep in mind that frozen fish that are frozen whole are generally lower in quality due to bad handling practices, and also processing. Fish that have bones, like salmon and cod, are discouraged from being frozen because they can break in the process. Fish with soft, oilier bodies such as bluefish or Spanish mackerel are not good to freeze, so should be eaten fresh when possible.

Salmon and trout (fatty fish) can last for at least three months in the freezer if you pack them properly, before the quality starts to degrade. You must also keep in mind that defrosted fish cannot be re-frozen, as the process of thawing accelerates degradation. The chances that fish will spoil are pretty high when you simply keep the fish in the freezer for hours without decompressing it or freezing it.

It may take as long as 30 minutes to several hours after eating the spoiled fish before you begin to experience symptoms. If you allow too long after a fish has died, and you do not refrigerate it for approximately 2-3 days, then you risk getting food poisoning.

Not many people are conscious about the best way to freeze fish when they capture a fish and want to preserve its freshness until they bring it home. Store freshly caught fish on ice, or if you cannot hold it, an ice solution that keeps the fish at between 32-40 degrees F. (similar to refrigerator temperatures). After you have caught the fish, wipe down the fishs surface with a cloth or paper towel, and store ungutted fish wet, but not soaked, by wrapping in a sheet of clear plastic wrap, placing the fish in a sealed bag for storage, and placing it on ice or snow.

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Do you need to clean fish before freezing?

Cleaning your fish is the first step before freezing it. This must be done correctly to prevent any undesirable scales, bones, or bacteria. Holding the fish with care Fins have sharp edges that can harm you.

Should fresh fish be rinsed before freezing?

Raw fish should be thoroughly cleaned, gutted, and cleaned before being put in an airtight, vacuum-sealed, or plastic ziplock bag. Only when you notice gas bubbles in the zip lock bag should you add little water to seal the bag.

Does the whole fish freeze well?

Fish with dense and strong flesh (including such mahi, cobia, or rockfish) hold up well when refrigerated. Softer-fleshed fish, especially fatty and oily fish, should be consumed fresh because they do not freeze well. Due to their high-fat content, salmon and tuna freeze rather well, but their fresh form is preferable.