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Can You Freeze Fleas To Death

Can You Freeze Fleas To Death

Can You Freeze Fleas To Death

Fleas are small, hardy creatures that can withstand a wide range of temperatures. Fleas are most vulnerable to freezing temperatures when they are in the egg or larval stage. When exposed to extreme cold, the water inside their cells freezes and expands, causing the cells to rupture and the fleas to die.

Even in the milder regions, where temperatures rarely dip below freezing, fleas are an annual annoyance. Fleas are a nuisance year-round, but can go extinct outdoors when the temperature drops below freezing. Fleas typically come into a home on pets, as noted above, but can quickly find shelter inside the home.

Fleas typically enter the home on your pets, but they can also hitch rides on clothes, and they have even been seen jumping straight into a home themselves. While you might not see any fleas during wintertime in colder climates, fleas can be fairly comfortable living inside your home, and they also like to hang out with wildlife. If you have a pet or home with fleas in warmer months, it is very possible that you will also have flies during winter months. Fleas can live year-round in your home or your hair, so winter seasons ultimately do not mean the flea infestation is going to disappear.

Even three to four months later, a flea infestation may come back because all of the fleas in your home went through all their life stages in that period. If you discover fleas in the home, you should act quickly to get rid of them there (as well as on your pets, and also in the yard). Even healthy pets can pick up fleas in highly contaminated areas, so be vigilant, and apply a natural flea repellent on any pets that are at risk. If your pets are out and about, and they might come into contact with squirrels, birds, or other wildlife, they could still pick up fleas.

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Watch to know how to survive freezing to death

Fleas will only land on humans in extreme cases, or if you are sleeping with, or within proximity of, a flea-infested dog or cat. They begin as an egg, hatching into larvae that form a cocoon, which after some time, hatches into the blood-sucking adult flea. Although adult fleas may outlive immature eggs or larvae, they will still be unable to survive freezing temperatures unless they take action fast.

Can fleas survive the freezer?Do flea eggs die when frozen?
Fleas, when exposed to extreme cold, the water inside their cells freezes and expands, causing the cells to rupture and the fleas to die.Fleas flourish at temperatures about 23 degrees Celcius; at this temperature, they go through their full life cycle in only a few weeks.
Fleas can’t survive below freezing; thus, to be successful, the environment would need to be at or below 30 F.One adult flea may lay a lot of eggs. Freezing temperatures only slow down the life cycle of fleas rather than killing the eggs.
Can fleas survive the freezer

Flea larvae and pupae come out once the flea eggs are laid, and part of why flea populations are so large is because adult fleas can lay nearly 20 eggs per day. Since the female flea can lay as many as 50 eggs a day on the host, flea multiplying occurs quickly and without delay. After hatching from eggs after two to 14 days, adult fleas pass through three larval stages, with the final one spinning a cocoon to protect the pupae stage.

Immature fleas — eggs and larvae — have trouble dealing with winters extreme cold temperatures, often dying within a couple of days. When temperatures drop below 55.4F (13) they are ineligible for survival, and at that temperature, all flea eggs or larvae will perish. Once the temperature drops to 37 degrees, that is cold enough to kill mature fleas, along with eggs, larvae, and pupae. Once temperatures drop below that, even down to freezing temperatures, the adult fleas begin dying.

Winter is about survival when it comes to fleas, the winter may kill them because the adult fleas will die in freezing temperatures, while flea eggs will die in even lower temperatures. The lower temperature gets away from the freezing point, the harder it is for the fleas to survive, and therefore, they die more quickly. In view of this, it is evident that not all fleas succumb when temperatures fall, even in the nations coldest regions.

Any flea left outside and exposed to open air will die if temperatures remain at 37 degrees or lower, day or night, for about ten days. Winter weather does not kill every flea inside your home, since you are likely using the heater on the coldest days, giving them an escape from winters chill. Warmer weather may lead to doubling your fleas life span, while the winter weather may lead to their death. While fleas and their nastier cousins, ticks, cannot flourish in the wintertime, it is not a given that they will all be dead by the time temperatures drop below freezing.

Freezing temperatures are death sentences to them, and they do best when it is warmer and wetter. Fleas and their young typically freeze to death in 2-10 days if exposed to sustained freezing temperatures (32degF/0degC or lower). It is important to note that frozen outside temperatures are highly hostile to all immature fleas, including eggs, which usually die within 10 days if freezing continues.

If exposed at least five days, the fleas die, and also cannot lay eggs during this period. Even in the dead of winter, these fleas will thrive in your homes heat and quickly become a nuisance. Inside your house, though, where it is nice and toasty warm, fleas will survive the entire winter, regardless of what temperature is outside.

For instance, fleas will survive inside homes that are heated, which is where the majority of household infections happen, as a result. Fleas may survive the winter on porches or in garages, and ticks may still be exposed during mild winter days. Most fleas survive the cold temperatures due to warmth and protection provided by their warm-bodied host animals. Small populations of fleas may be found year-round on both domestic and wild animals, including in colder months.

Cat fleas made a name for themselves by lusting after the blood of cats, but can survive on many different hosts. Not only do fleas suck blood out of their hosts and be annoying, they may also carry tapeworms into their hosts. Some people get the impression that as soon as the weather starts getting cold, thousands of fleas from the outdoors will hop and ski into a warm home.

In contrast, only five per cent of adult fleas on average die when held in a paper vacuum bag for toxicology testing, and just three per cent on average die in the moving air. Six tests with vacuuming the adult fleas yielded 96 percent of the fleas killed; three tests with the pupae vacuumed, and one with the larvae (in the third developmental stage) in vacuum, yielded 100 percent killing.

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Can fleas survive the freezer?

Fleas can’t survive below freezing; thus, to be successful, the environment would need to be at or below 30 F. However, keep in mind that fleas are pretty opportunistic. They will relocate in quest of a warm place.

Do flea eggs die when frozen?

Fleas flourish at temperatures about 23 degrees Celcius, and at this temperature, they go through their full life cycle in only a few weeks. In this little period, one adult flea may lay a lot of eggs. Freezing temperatures only slow down the life cycle of fleas rather than killing the eggs.

Do fleas ever go away?

It is improbable that they will disappear on their own even though some may remain for two to three weeks or even up to a year on the host they encounter. By depositing eggs in carpets, bedding, or gardens, fleas may also proliferate very fast and extend the infection.